Kit-Napping…When Good Intentions Go Astray

Kitten season is upon us, and here are some tips if you find a litter in the wild. First…

Leave Them Be!

We know. This advice seems counterintuitive as you might want to jump straight into rescue mode. But, unless there are obvious signs of disease or malnutrition, chances are they have a mom who will return to provide them with the care they need most. She may be away temporarily while hunting or even hiding in your presence…but chances are she plans to come back.

Generally, human intervention is not required until/unless they are old enough to be spay/neutered (around 8 weeks for kittens). Then, trapping and surgery are in order.

That is the Time to Act!

If it appears that mom is not around and help is needed, then it makes sense for your to step in. Sprinkling flour or other non-toxic substance around around the kittens and looking for pawprints can help verify if, in fact, mom is coming to care for her young ones.

Contact Us!

If they can be handled, we may have room for them at the shelter. Please be aware that during kitten season (spring), many shelters are filled to capacity with kittens, and often, we are no exception. We may ask you to care for them in your home until shelter space can be made. But never fear! We will make sure you have the resources and support for success! You can take the first step by checking out our foster information web page! If you have additional question, please reach out to our foster coordinator, Amber, at amberz@bfhs.com.

In some circumstances, we may decide the best option is Trap/Spay or Neuter/Return. Please ask for more information on Trap/Spay or Neuter/Return and the benefits it provides the community and the animals.

Thank You for wanting to help these innocent babies! For many, you are the difference between life and death. Through calculated actions and ongoing education, we can all make a difference in ensuring our behaviors and treatment of all animals are humane and truly in their best interest.  

Please visit the ASPCA for additional information